The Origins of the HTML blink Tag

Lou Montulli in an old (but it seems to be impossible to find out how old) post on what appears to be a kind of personal website:

At some point in the evening I mentioned that it was sad that Lynx was not going to be able to display many of the HTML extensions that we were proposing, I also pointed out that the only text style that Lynx could exploit given its environment was blinking text. We had a pretty good laugh at the thought of blinking text, and talked about blinking this and that and how absurd the whole thing would be. The evening progressed pretty normally from there, with a fair amount more drinking and me meeting the girl who would later become my first wife.

  1. Shocker.
  2. It seems pretty sad that someone so involved with developing the web as we know it has this for a website.

Stuff You Missed in History Class - Beast of Gevaudan

This is the perfect pre-Halloween podcast. Grisly deaths; heroic figures, people who attempt to rise to "hero" status, but make themselves look like fools; supposedly supernatural monsters; all in late 18th century France.

And, the best part? After you listen, you can watch Brotherhood of the Wolf with a fire and a glass of wine. That's exactly how I'd like to lead into Halloween.

Robot

It's not a common occurrence that I get to showcase the meeting of networking and Jim Henson, but here we are. In 1963, Jim Henson created this video for The Bell System's brand-new topic "Data Communication".

The organizers of the seminar, Inpro, actually set the tone for the film in a three-page memo from one of Inpro's principals, Ted Mills to Henson. Mills outlined the nascent, but growing relationship between man and machine: a relationship not without tension and resentment: "He [the robot] is sure that All Men Basically Want to Play Golf, and not run businesses — if he can do it better."