Updating rsync on OS X

I recently needed to move a few directorys of tens- or hundreds-of-thousands of files to my Synology. Perfect use for rsync!

Unfortunately, rsync on OS X is stuck at 2.6.9, and I wanted to take advantage of some of the new features of 3.1.0. Specifically better handling of OS X metadata, and progress indication.

Fortunately, this walks you through a quick build and installation of rsync 3.1.0 in your /usr/local/bin folder. The benefit is that you can install your new version alongside the OS X included version (which is installed in /usr/bin/). Then you can add a couple aliases to your .bash_profile to treat them appropriately.

My aliases are as follows:

alias oldrsync="/usr/bin/rsync"
 alias rsync="/usr/local/bin/rsync"
 alias nrsync="/usr/local/bin/rsync -a  --info=progress2"

The first makes the system-installed 2.6.9 version refrencable by using the command oldrsync. The second makes the version in /usr/local/bin/ (which is 3.1.0, in my case) the one that runs when I type rsync. Finally, the third references the new version of rsync with a couple flags I almost always use.

Source: http://selfsuperinit.com/2014/01/04/an-upd...

The Terminal

Craig Hockenberry put together a really good list of Terminal tips and tricks useful for developers. Many of these require only a little thought to be useful for network engineers, as well. Being able to do stuff like this is a big part of why I've always been a fan of using Terminal directly, in OS X, to ssh to remote devices, as opposed to using a GUI like SecureCRT.